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Podcast Episode 19: Christian Karma and Buddhist Dogfood

Podcast Episode 19: Christian Karma and Buddhist Dogfood

And welcome back! This is Episode 19 of the Daily Buddhism, and I am your host, Brian Schell. I don’t have too much in the way of announcements this week, but I do want to point out a few quick . . . → Read More: Podcast Episode 19: Christian Karma and Buddhist Dogfood

Dhammapada Chapter 3: Thought

Dhammapada Chapter 3: Thought

33. As a fletcher makes straight his arrow, a wise man makes straight his trembling and unsteady thought, which is difficult to guard, difficult to hold back.

34. As a fish taken from his watery home and thrown on dry ground, our thought trembles all over in order to escape the dominion of . . . → Read More: Dhammapada Chapter 3: Thought

Koan: The Moon Cannot Be Stolen

Koan: The Moon Cannot Be Stolen

Ryokan, a Zen master, lived the simplest kind of life in a little hut at the foot of a mountain. One evening a thief visited the hut only to discover there was nothing to steal.

Ryokan returned and caught him. “You have come a long way to visit me,” he told the . . . → Read More: Koan: The Moon Cannot Be Stolen

Buddhist Pet Food

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A Reader recently wrote:

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I have what is probably a really dumb question,

I am attempting to follow a vegetarian lifestyle. I also share my home with three cats and two dogs and one foster cat. I am a big animal activist. But, doesn’t the purchase of pet food, which is made out of animal . . . → Read More: Buddhist Pet Food

Buddhist Jargon and Terminology

“Bad Language”

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A Reader recently wrote:
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Often, as I read English-language Buddhist resources, I am bombarded with terms from Pali, Tibetan and Sanskrit. Perhaps it would be more helpful if Buddhist teachers translated (as accurately as possible) the various Buddhistic terms into English (or whatever language needed for the culture) rather than expecting the practitioner to keep . . . → Read More: Buddhist Jargon and Terminology

Intoxication: The Last Word (For now)

I have one more reader comment on the ‚ÄòGreat Intoxication Debate‚Äù from last week (see the comments on last week’s post here and here), and then I think I’m going to let that subject go for a while ‚Ķ until it comes up again- somehow I don’t think we’ve really resolved it, or that we ever . . . → Read More: Intoxication: The Last Word (For now)

Christians and Karma?

Do Christians Have Karma?

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A Reader recently wrote:
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I was born and raised a hell-fire and brimstone Baptist. My grandfather was a Southern Baptist preacher and I literally grew up in church. By the time I was in my teens I had begun to question my upbringing and have finally been able to break the bonds of my . . . → Read More: Christians and Karma?

Podcast Episode 18: Compassion, Faith & Intoxicants

Welcome back! This is Episode 18 of the Daily Buddhism, and I’m your host, Brian Schell.

Weekly Announcements:

I have just a couple of quick announcements today. First, I am now on Twitter. I am not completely sure what it’s good for yet, but I’m in the process f . . . → Read More: Podcast Episode 18: Compassion, Faith & Intoxicants

Dhammapada Chapter 2: On Earnestness

Chapter II
On Earnestness

21. Earnestness is the path of immortality (Nirvana), thoughtlessness the path of death. Those who are in earnest do not die, those who are thoughtless are as if dead already.

22. Those who are advanced in earnestness, having understood this clearly, delight in earnestness, and rejoice in the knowledge of the Ariyas (the elect).

23. . . . → Read More: Dhammapada Chapter 2: On Earnestness

Koan: Great Waves

Great Waves

In the early days of the Meiji era there lived a well-known wrestler called O-nami, Great Waves.

O-nami was immensely strong and knew the art of wrestling. In his private bouts he defeated even his teacher, but in public he was so bashful that his own pupils threw him.

O-nami felt he should go to a Zen . . . → Read More: Koan: Great Waves